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4 edition of The stress induced volatile emissions (SIVE) technique for measuring levels of stress in conifer seedlings found in the catalog.

The stress induced volatile emissions (SIVE) technique for measuring levels of stress in conifer seedlings

David R. Drakeford

The stress induced volatile emissions (SIVE) technique for measuring levels of stress in conifer seedlings

by David R. Drakeford

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Published by Canada BC Forest Resource Development Agreement in [Victoria, B.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conifers -- Effect of stress on -- Measurement.,
  • Gases from plants -- Measurement.,
  • Gas chromatography.,
  • Conifers -- Seedlings.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementcompiled by D.R. Drakeford ; edited by C.D.B. Hawkins.
    SeriesFRDA report,, 084
    ContributionsHawkins, Christopher David Borden., Canada-British Columbia Forest Resource Development Agreement.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK494 .D73 1989
    The Physical Object
    Pagination20 leaves ;
    Number of Pages20
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1586029M
    ISBN 100662171241
    LC Control Number91112655
    OCLC/WorldCa27977344

    Heavy metal treatment alone did not induce VOC emission in maize plants; however, the higher Cu dose was found to prime for enhanced volatile production that can be triggered by caterpillar feeding. Cu stress correlated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species in roots and priming of herbivore‐induced jasmonic acid in leaves. Steindel F, Beauchamp J, Hansel A, Kesselmeier J, Kleist E, Kuhn U, Wisthaler A, Wildt J () Stress induced VOC emissions from mildew infested oak. Geophys Res Abstr 7:EGUA Google Scholar Takabayashi J, Dicke M, Posthumus MA () Volatile herbivore-induced terpenoids in plant-mite interactions: variation caused by biotic and.

    We studied the modifications in photosynthetic characteristics and constitutive and stress-induced volatile emissions in response to single and combined applications of acute ozone (4, 5, and 6 ppm) and wounding treatments through recovery ( h) in a constitutive isoprene and mono- and sesquiterpene emitter Eucalyptus globulus. Overall. Biosynthesis and Emission of Stress-Induced Volatile Terpenes in Roots and Leaves of Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Andrew Muchlinski1†, Xinlu Chen2†, John T. Lovell3, Tobias G. Köllner4, Kyle A. Pelot5, Philipp Zerbe5, Meredith Ruggiero 1, LeMar Callaway III1, Suzanne Laliberte, Feng Chen2 * and Dorothea Tholl1 *.

    The mechanisms of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were investigated in laboratory plants emitted mainly monoterpenes and acetone. Isoprene was emitted only in small amounts, but the mechanisms of its emissions were similar to those of the other compounds. Prolonged drought stress combined with high leaf temperatures can induce programmed leaf senescence involving lipid peroxidation, and the loss of net carbon assimilation during early stages of tree mortality. Periodic droughts are known to induce widespread tree mortality in the Amazon rainforest, but little is known about the role of lipid peroxidation during drought-induced leaf senescence.


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The stress induced volatile emissions (SIVE) technique for measuring levels of stress in conifer seedlings by David R. Drakeford Download PDF EPUB FB2

Changes in volatile emission under stress conditions supply provide evidence that VOCs are linked with the plant responses to stress. Their emissions often increase under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under leaf damage, water, heat and light stress (Vickers et al., ).

Some of the volatiles, such as ethylene and NO, are primarily Cited by: Treatment with MeJA strongly induced volatile emission from leaves compared to mock controls, with 13 compounds identified (Figure 1 and Supplementary Table 1).

Major induced compounds were (E)-β-caryophyllene and β-elemene accounting for ∼38 and ∼17%, respectively, of total volatile emissions (Figure 1 and Supplementary Table 1).Cited by: 5.

In our investigation, a possible reason for O 3 applied as a single stress not having a strong effect could be due to the relatively low O 3 concentration used compared to earlier studies of brassicaceous plants that reported The stress induced volatile emissions book 3-induced volatile emissions (Himanen et al., ).Author: Eliezer Khaling, Thomas Agyei, Simo Jokinen, Jarmo K.

Holopainen, James D. Blande. Thus, in assessing the stress dose vs. induced emission responses, it is important to consider the substrate-level and physico-chemical constraints on the rate of induced volatile production and emission.

Conclusion. Plants in natural environments are under fluctuating pressure of various abiotic and biotic by: The emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: Stress, acclimation, and developmental responses et al., b), the induced emissions can critically alter the.

estimates of E S and also require. Abstract. Plants in their natural environment are often exposed to a variety of environmental stresses. This chapter emphasises the importance of distinguishing among stress effects on constitutive and stress-induced volatile emissions and, within constitutive emissions, among stress effects on emissions from specialised storage compartments (storage emissions) and de novo emissions.

Studies addressing the regulation of stress induced volatile emission by halotolerant plant growth promoting bacteria containing ACC (1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylate) deaminase are also limited. In response to herbivore attack, plants activate a wide array of defences that can reduce herbivore damage, including blends of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be used as foraging cues by natural enemies of the herbivores1,2,3,ore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) have also been implicated in plant–plant communication, as they can be perceived by neighbouring plants5,6, and.

The expression of SmSQS was significantly induced by the same set of stress factors that induced the emission of volatile squalene from S. moellendorffii plants. Taken together, these results support that SmSQS is responsible for the biosynthesis of volatile squalene and volatile squalene may have a role in the defense of S.

moellendorffii. The emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) is usually thought to depend on species-specific emission capacities that vary with seasonal and phenological conditions. Actual—so called constitutive—emissions are then calculated from prevailing temperature and radiation.

However, various abiotic and biotic stressors such as ozone, extreme radiation and temperature conditions. Keywords: ozone impact, herbivory, wounding, oxidative stress, induced emissions, BVOCs, modeling. Citation: Grote R, Sharma M, Ghirardo A and Schnitzler J-P () A New Modeling Approach for Estimating Abiotic and Biotic Stress-Induced de novo Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds From Plants.

Front. For. Glob. Induced VOC emissions. The crucial question in the induced production of VOCs under stress is whether these compounds can increase the performance of a tree. In general, induced production of secondary chemicals in plants to defend against a stress factor has fitness costs when compared with unstressed plants (Heil and Baldwin ).

On the. Individual biotic and abiotic stresses, such as high temperature, high light and herbivore attack, are well known to increase the emission of volatile organic compounds from plants. Much less is known about the effect of multiple, co-occurring stress factors, despite the fact that multiple stresses are probably the rule under natural conditions.

Rüdiger Grote, Monica Sharma, Andrea Ghirardo, Jörg-Peter Schnitzler, A New Modeling Approach for Estimating Abiotic and Biotic Stress-Induced de novo Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds From Plants, Frontiers in Forests and.

A New Modeling Approach for Estimating Abiotic and Biotic Stress-Induced de novo Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds From Plants. Frontiers in Forests and Global Change2 DOI: /ffgc Jiayan Ye, Yifan Jiang, Linda-Liisa Veromann-Jürgenson, Ülo Niinemets. A recent investigation on influences of heavy metal stress on plant volatiles also supported the “single biochemical mechanism for multiple stressors” model, and suggested that heavy metal stress is a prime factor for herbivore-induced plant volatile emission, and Cu stress correlated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species in.

Special Issue: Induced biogenic volatile organic compounds from plants Multiple stress factors and the emission of plant VOCs Jarmo K. Holopainen1 and Jonathan Gershenzon2 1Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.

BoxFI Kuopio, Finland 2Department of Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Kno¨ll-Strasse 8, D. on the volatile emissions. Atmospheric pollutants are an important facet of the abiotic environment and can impinge on a plant’s volatile-mediated defences in multiple ways at multiple temporal scales.

They can exert changes in volatile emissions through oxidative stress, as is the case with ozone pollution. The pollutants, in particular.

Volatile emissions from Alnus glutinosa induced by herbivory are quantitatively related to the extent of damage. Journal of Chemical Ecology 37(1), Crespo, E., Hordijk, C.

Abstract. Herbivorous insects, such as phloem-sap feeders and chewers, induce resistance response in plants. There is a long-standing hypothesis that herbivores increase the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Arabidopsis plant model.

However, most works were restricted to the study of the regulation of plant VOC emissions and only in some cases to the effects of insects on. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial C4 grass, represents an important species in natural and anthropogenic grasslands of North America.

Its resilience to abiotic and biotic stress has made switchgrass a preferred bioenergy crop. However, little is known about the mechanisms of resistance of switchgrass against pathogens and herbivores.

Volatile compounds such as terpenes have.Biosynthesis and emission of stress-induced volatile terpenes in roots and leaves of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), a perennial C4 grass, represents an important species in natural and anthropogenic grasslands of North America.With chemical analyses, they confirmed that lima bean plants under water stress produce more of the attractive volatiles than non-stressed plants.

Their study was done with undamaged plants and they did not report on any effect of water stress on the emission of induced volatiles (Takabayashi et al., ). In the case of corn, undamaged plants.